God Smiling On Us

Posted on July 21, 2015 by - Everyday Stewardship

God Smiling On UsThe second characteristic of an “Everyday steward” is that he/she is prayerful. It would seem that would be a given. Certainly any follower of Jesus is called to pray. However, this characteristic means more than whether or not one has a prayer life.

Prayer is more than just communication between God and us. It is about relationship and living a life with Jesus ever-present in it. (more…)

Grateful for the Community of Faith

Posted on July 16, 2015 by - Everyday Stewardship

Community of FaithI spent five years in Alaska as a missionary prior to becoming Catholic.  Four years of that was in a little town south of Anchorage with a strong bohemian population.  As the town pastor, I got to know many of those good people.  More than a few were devotees of The Grateful Dead, a band I paid little attention to in my younger days but grew to love as a result of my encounters with the folks in my small Alaskan community.

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Shopping Frenzy

Posted on July 15, 2015 by - Everyday Stewardship

shoppingThe Internet is buzzing loudly today with sales at Amazon and Wal-Mart! Now, other online merchants like Target and Best Buy are creating other artificial shopping holidays for next week. Everywhere online you see the term Christmas in July to describe the frenzy of sales and shopping.

Of course it is all an illusion.

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Where Am I, Today?

Posted on July 14, 2015 by - Everyday Stewardship

CalvinHobbesOne of the characteristics of an everyday steward is that he or she is mindful. When we are mindful of where we are, what we are doing, and our all that surrounds us, two things are possible: 1) We can truly be grateful to God for all that has been given to us, and 2) We can hear Christ speak to us in ways that we would miss otherwise. We find ourselves living in the present without the baggage of the past and without fear of the future.

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Getting Away from It All

Posted on July 14, 2015 by - Connect! Sunday Reflection

For Sunday, July 19, 2015, 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

A hammock on a beautiful beach.At a time when you would think a lot of Americans are heading for the beach or the campground for vacation, more of us may actually be staying home.

A survey last January found an astonishing forty-two percent of workers didn’t take a single vacation day in 2014.

What’s more:

“Women took fewer vacation days than men; young Americans are skimping on vacation days; suburbia is taking slightly more vacation days than rest of the country; workers in the U.S. South took least vacation days while those in the U.S. West did most; and the poor are bearing the brunt of least amount of vacation days in the country.”

It can be hard—and, of course, expensive—to take time from work. And the demands of a lot of jobs make finding time for vacation sometimes impossible. That’s not new. As this Sunday’s Gospel reminds us, even Jesus had difficulty taking a break. Setting out for a “deserted place” for rest, he couldn’t escape his work. Moved by the needs of those who sought him out—appearing to him “like sheep without a shepherd”—he couldn’t help but continue to minister to them.

The thought of an overworked Jesus still seeking to serve, teach, and heal those around him is both confounding and consoling. On the one hand, it would be nice to think that even the Son of God could catch a breather every now and then. But on the other hand, we realize that the One who is so much like us—”in all things but sin”—is also continually close to us. He does not, cannot, turn his back on us in our need. Emmanuel, God with us, continues to remain with us—even when he faces the very real and very human need to get away.

Whether we find ourselves able to go on vacation or not this season, we can take some solace in this simple but consoling truth:

Christ is always near us—available, accessible, attentive. No matter what, the Messiah doesn’t go on vacation.

Dcn. Greg Kandra

PRAYER

O almighty and merciful God,
Who hast commissioned Thy angels to guide and protect us,
command them to be our assiduous companions
from our setting out until our return;
to clothe us with their invisible protection;
to keep us from all danger of collision,
of fire, of explosion, of falls and bruises;
and finally, having preserved us from all evil,
and especially from sin,
to guide us to our heavenly home.
Through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.
—Prayer for Travelers attributed to Bishop Felix Dupanloup, 1802–1878.

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